Yesterday I helped Dave move the cows to a new pasture. This happens whenever they consume or trample most of the good grasses in their pen (typically between a half and full acre). As we clear the fields of brush, improving the grass quality, the pens will get smaller and the moves will be more frequent.

This day happened to be the fourth move for the girls, but I must admit that it was only the first time I helped. Dave has everything down to a science by now, so having extra hands cut down on the overall labor time significantly. It was so great to work side-by-side that I have already volunteered to be Dave's "right hand man" for all future relocations.

Here is a peek into the process (all caught on my phone):

Maple & Daisy were moved to a temporary pen near the big garden. 

  Dave brushed  diatomaceous earth  into their hides, hoping it will cut down on the number of flies that pester them.

Dave brushed diatomaceous earth into their hides, hoping it will cut down on the number of flies that pester them.

When I mowed the grass earlier in the week, Dave had the foresight to instruct me to leave this patch alone. The cows enjoyed their all-you-can-eat clover buffet IMMENSELY.

Dave walked in front of me, pulling up stakes, while I trailed behind, winding up the electric polytwine.

Dave walked ahead, installing the stakes along the perimeter of the new area. I walked backwards behind him, unwinding the electric polytwine and attaching it to the stakes.

While installing the fence along the new perimeter, we found a clutch of eggs in an abandoned guinea fowl nest.

I scrubbed out the trough and Dave carried it to its new home. Methinks I got the easier job.

It takes almost four loads to fill the trough.

I didn't even notice the slogan until after I saw the photo. Well played, bucket.

As sunset approaches, all that's left to do is get the halters off the girls. Unfortunately for the tired homesteaders, they think tag is fun.

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